Visual

‘Catching Water for Recycling: Shower, 2008’ by Julie Millowick

Julie Millowick is a Photographer and Lecturer with a commitment to documenting people and environmental conditions in her own regions of Central Victoria. In 2007 as Vice President of MAP (Many Australian Photographers), Julie helped co-ordinate 37 photographers across Australia to produce the exhibition and book Beyond Reasonable Drought. This image displays water recycling methods during […]

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‘Water Use Signs, 2007’ by Julie Millowick

Julie Millowick is a Photographer and Lecturer with a commitment to documenting people and environmental conditions in her own regions of Central Victoria. In 2007 as Vice President of MAP (Many Australian Photographers), Julie helped co-ordinate 37 photographers across Australia to produce the exhibition and book Beyond Reasonable Drought. In this image, Boyd Thornbury displays his

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‘Continuing Drought, 2003’ by Julie Millowick

Julie Millowick is a Photographer and Lecturer with a commitment to documenting people and environmental conditions in her own regions of Central Victoria. In 2007 as Vice President of MAP (Many Australian Photographers), Julie helped co-ordinate 37 photographers across Australia to produce the exhibition and book Beyond Reasonable Drought. In the above image, Julie and her

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Where there is wind (there will be dust), a video-essay poem by Jesse Boylan

Jesse Boylan is an artist living on Djaara country in Central Victoria, Australia, interested in expanded documentary practice and the role art plays in environmental and social justice issues. In November 2023, they spent three weeks in the Murray region as part of Parched: Cultures of Drought – a research project exploring how people and communities

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Yorta Yorta artist Lin Onus

One of Yorta Yorta artist Lin Onus’ best known works is Barmah Forest (1994), an eerily serene scene of Biyala (river red gums) immersed and reflected in water, not unlike the later Floodwater ‘Wooroong Nucko’ (1995) that explicitly represents the Dungala (Murray River) in flood. In Barmah Forest, what might at first appear a realist

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